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Decrease Chances Of Cardiovascular Risks In 2000 Steps Or 20 Minutes Of Walking

Results from new study show decrease in cardiovascular risks associated with walking for approximately 20 minutes per day

  • Cardiovascular risks increased for those with impaired glucose tolerance

  • Cardiovascular risks can be decreased in 2000 steps

  • Study claimed as “the strongest evidence yet for the importance of physical activity in high” cardiovascular risks

cardiovascular risks

Cardiovascular risks can be decreased with 2000 steps per day
Image by Science Daily

Results from a study conducted on cardiovascular risks were published in The Lancet on Friday.  The study followed participants from 40 different countries.  Each of the 9,036 participants were diagnosed with impaired glucose tolerance, and had either an existing cardiovascular disease, or cardiovascular risks.

Impaired glucose tolerance, or IGT, is a pre-diabetic state of hyperglycemia that is associated with insulin resistance and increased cardiovascular risks.  Impaired glucose intolerance may appear years before type 2 diabetes.

According to the Mayo Clinic, prediabetes often has no symptoms.  However one sign that can signify a prediabetic condition is darkened areas of skin around the neck, armpits, elbows, knees, and knuckles.  This condition is called acanthosis nigricans.

Each of the participants in the study on cardiovascular risks had ambulatory activity assessed by a pedometer at their baseline, and after each 12 month period.

The conclusion of the study conducted on participants with IGT showed that those who walked at a vigorous pace for approximately 20 minutes per day, or 2000 steps had a significant decrease in cardiovascular risks.

In individuals at high cardiovascular risk with impaired glucose tolerance, both baseline levels of daily ambulatory activity and change in ambulatory activity display a graded inverse association with the subsequent risk of a cardiovascular event.

“These findings provide the strongest evidence yet for the importance of physical activity in high risk populations and will inform diabetes and cardiovascular disease prevention programs worldwide.  Changing physical activity levels through simply increasing the number of steps taken can substantially reduce the risk of  cardiovascular disease,” says Dr. Thomas Yates from the University of Leicester in the UK.

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