Home / Google Introduces Glucose Monitoring Smart Contact Lens For Diabetics

Google Introduces Glucose Monitoring Smart Contact Lens For Diabetics

Google glucose monitoring smart contact lens could save diabetics’ fingers

  • Google glucose monitoring smart contact lens still in early planning phase

  • The new glucose monitoring smart contact lens reads the wearer’s tears

Google glucose monitoring smart contact lens

Google glucose monitoring smart contact lens
Image by AP

It appears that Google is attempting to give diabetics’ fingers a much needed rest.  Google is working on developing a glucose monitoring smart contact lens for diabetics.

The glucose monitoring smart contact lens utilizes an incredibly small wireless chip, glucose sensor, and hair thin antenna embedded in contact lens material.  The smart contact lens obtains readings at lightning speed, taking the reading once per second from the user’s tears.  A pinhole allows tear fluid to trickle into the area where the sensor is located.  The antenna allows the information to travel from the smart contact lens to the reading device.

Joseph Lorenzo Hall, chief technologist at the Center for Democracy & Technology states that the data transferred from the lens will not be able to be manipulated in order to ensure that the readings are constantly correct.  Incorrect data could have serious repercussions due to incorrect amounts of insulin being injected as a reaction.

“We’re also investigating the potential for this to serve as an early warning for the wearer, so we’re exploring integrating tiny LED lights that could light up to indicate that glucose levels have crossed above or below certain thresholds,” state project co-founders Brian Otis and Babak Parviz, “Uncontrolled blood sugar puts people at risk for a range of dangerous complications, some short-term and others longer term, including damage to the eyes, kidneys and heart.”

Brian Otis and Babak Parviz are not fans of pricking fingers to check blood glucose levels.  They state, “It’s disruptive, and it’s painful, and, as a result, many people with diabetes check their blood glucose less often than they should.”

There is currently no release date for the glucose monitoring smart contact lens as it is still in its early planning stages and awaiting FDA approval for use.

Currently one in 19 people in the world are affected by diabetes.  Projections by the International Diabetes Federation expect one in 10 people to be affected by diabetes by 2035.

About Katana Sohma


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