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Supreme Court Will Not Hear Case On Same-Sex Wedding Photographer Refusal

The case of the same-sex wedding photographer refusal that was brought to the Supreme Court has been declined.  This now leaves the state’s decision to be the final decision in the case.

Supreme Court Will Not Hear Case On Same-Sex Wedding Photographer Refusal

Supreme Court Will Not Hear Case On Same-Sex Wedding Photographer Refusal

The Supreme Court Building.

The decision was whether or not a New Mexico wedding photographer was within her rights to refuse to work at a same-sex wedding ceremony.  Elaine and Jonathan Huguenin’s phoptography studio told Vanessa Willock and Misti Collinsworth in 2006 that they would only shoot photos for traditional wedding ceremonies.  They were able to find another photographer, but also filed a complaint against the couple’s business with the New Mexico Human Rights Commission.  Their refusal to shoot the wedding violated the state’s anti-discrimination law.

The case would have presented the question once again- can businesses discriminate if it goes against their beliefs?  There has been quite the debate lately on the matter.

New Mexico decided that the Huguenin’s photography studio was in the wrong.  The way they discriminated was compared to refusing to shoot a wedding due to race.  This was clearly a violation of New Mexico’s anti-discrimination law according to the court.

The Huguenin’s objection and petition to the Supreme Court was different than the usual objections based on religious beliefs.  They wanted to petition that it impended on their freedom of speech.  Because of their religious beliefs, they did not want the message of their photography business to communicate a different message than the message their religious beliefs send.  It was all about the message and image- not because they had conflicting beliefs.

The case brings up other cases where it seems opposing beliefs are being pinned against each other and it is up to the court to decide who is right and who is wrong.  Regardless of which side the court deems “correct,” someone’s beliefs always end up being held as “more correct” or “more defended” than others.  These kind of cases are difficult because of the freedom of speech Americans are given and the religious freedom that is also soo important to society.  The Supreme Court is trying to keep from making decisions on cases such as this one, but how long can they really hold neutral ground?

Supreme Court Will Not Hear Case On Same-Sex Wedding Photographer Refusal

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