Home / GOOGLE NEWS / Fecal Transplants Disguised as Poop Pills- The New Way to Tackle Clostridium Infections!

Fecal Transplants Disguised as Poop Pills- The New Way to Tackle Clostridium Infections!

What if we told you there was a surprisingly easy way to tackle Clostridium infections, and that it does not involve antibiotics?
Poop pills are the new talk of the town, and they are exactly what you need to recover from the condition. Seems too yucky? Well, it’s
definitely better than clutching your stomach and getting to the hospital with a severe case of the infection for sure!

The concept of treating repeat  C.difficile infections  with fecal transplants is now being embraced by researchers.
The right mix of gut bacteria to keep the gastrointestinal tract running smoothly contained in a healthy person’s poop is the idea
behind these new poop pills. The recipient can get his or her G1 tract back in working order by simply transplanting a sample from that microbiome into a person whose gut has been colonized by C.difficile.

The transplants really works successfully and has been demonstrated in several studies. Researchers have reported in a breakthrough report published last year in the New England  Journal of Medicine that CDI patients who got a fecal transplant (in addition to a bowel cleansing and the antibiotic vanacomycin) fared far better than those who didn’t.  13 patients saw their infections clear up after one treatment and two of the remaining three got better after a second treatment – an overall cure rate of 94% of the total 16 patients in the fecal transplant group.

Fecal Transplants May Turn out to be Effective Against C.Difficiles

Fecal Transplants May Turn out to be Effective Against C.Difficiles

A mixture of fresh stool and lightly salted water – through a nasal tube that delivered the solution directly into the small intestine was
received by the of the patients in their study.  And in case you’re wondering how you’re supposed to tolerate it, this tested remedy
cannot be  smelled or tasted by the patients. But yes, there’s a catch too-cramping and bloating were some mild side effects caused by the pills in six patients, and all symptoms were resolved within three days.  According to the JAMA study, none of the 20 patients threw up after taking the pills.

Though the researchers described the results as preliminary, they said they could help make fecal transplants “accessible to a wider
population of patients, in addition to potentially making the procedure safer.”
That said, would you mind trying out the poop pill?

About Enozia Vakil

Enozia Vakil is an online entrepreneur, writer, editor and an avid reader. She has been associated with some of the best names in both online and print media, and holds a degree in Alternative Medicine.