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Pancreatic Cancer Risk Higher when the Gene Runs in the Family

With less than 5 percent survival rate within 5 years of its occurrence, pancreatic cancer is undoubtedly one of the most deadly forms of cancer.

Less than 5% of the population who are affected with pancreatic cancer survive for a term greater than five years and only less than 20% of the individuals go for tumour extraction. Only some of these people turn out to be lucky whose tumours have a lesser size of tumours can be removed easily and their lymph nodes are a clear indication of the disease.

Pancreatic Cancer Risks Higher When Running in the Family Photo Credit: FreeDigitalPhotos

Pancreatic Cancer Risks Higher When Running in the Family
Photo Credit: FreeDigitalPhotos

Only three percent of the cancer cases affect the pancreas. In real numbers, however, it means that close to 50,000 people will suffer from it in 2014 alone, according to American Cancer Association data, Medical News Today reports.

Two researchers from Australia published an article in the ACA’s peer-reviewed journal called CANCER, which states that pancreatic cancer can be found as early as 10 t 20 years prior to the arrival of noticeable signs. Furthermore, this type of cancer is associated with hereditary traits. Hence, the wide detection capacity can be put to use in increase the survival rates for people suffering from pancreatic cancer drastically.

Professor Andrew Biankin and Dr. Jeremy Humphris from Garvan Institute of Medical Research in Sydney processed 766 medical records of cancer patients between the years 1994-2012 . The results showed at least one result they got through other studies. Approximately 9% of the people suffering from pancreatic cancer had a first degree relative with the same disease.

In the families where one person suffers from pancreatic cancer is also connected with the other members of the family having increased risk of having other types of cancers. Also, active smokers get the disease 10 years earlier, which is yet another reason to give up smoking before any permanent damage takes place.

“These findings are important because they suggest that the genes we inherit from our parents likely play a significant role in our lifetime risk of developing pancreatic cancer,” said lead study author Andrew Biankin, now at the University of Glasgow, in Scotland, in a news release. “Secondly, they emphasize that when assessing someone’s individual risk of developing pancreatic cancer, it may be important to assess not just family history of pancreatic cancer but other malignancies too. Finally, our data emphasize the importance of smoking abstinence.”

 

About Enozia Vakil

Enozia Vakil is an online entrepreneur, writer, editor and an avid reader. She has been associated with some of the best names in both online and print media, and holds a degree in Alternative Medicine.