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World Health Organization Says 1.1 Billion Teenagers At Risk Of Hearing Loss

The World Health Organization released a statement, saying that up to 1.1 Billion teenagers and young adults are at risk of hearing loss due to their use of headphones. Youth are more and more at risk as the use of personal audio devices have become increasingly popular and accessible. The level of volume that many of these people listen to music at is more than enough to damage their ears. By highlighting these little known risks, they hope to stave off some of the population that would otherwise become subject to deteriorated hearing in the future.

World Health Organization Says 1.1 Billion Teenagers At Risk Of Hearing Loss

WHO Says Billion Teenagers At Risk Of Hearing Loss

The World Health Organization suggests wrap-around style headphones that do a better job of cancelling surrounding noises. (Image from Wikipedia)

Some smartphones and other listening devices already have suggestions or warnings pop-up on the screen, and they must be acknowledged prior to increasing volumes beyond a pre-determined level. Devices like the Samsung Galaxy series of devices is smart enough to know that when there is something plugged into the headphone jack, that it will only allow the volume to reach a safe level without the user acknowledging a health warning. This type of prompt can have some effect on the long term hearing loss that users may suffer as a consequence of misuse.

Younger people tend to enjoy listening to their music louder than older adults, and many view the immersion as a form of deeper experience with the songs. Others may choose to turn the volume up to drown out the sounds around them when they are studying, or even participating in sports. The type of damage that can be suffered is almost comparable to the damage that can be experienced at live concerts.

One common symptom that is often experienced by those who listen to prolonged amounts of loud noises is a ringing in the ears known as tinnitus. To help prevent the need for exposure to such loud volumes, the World Health Organization recommends that listeners wear tighter fitting headphones, or even noise-cancelling ones that can more easily eliminate surrounding noise. This would reduce the need to turn the headphones beyond a safe volume just to focus on the song.

World Health Organization Says 1.1 Billion Teenagers At Risk Of Hearing Loss.

About Steven Kenniff

Lives in Phoenix, AZ. Graduated from Arizona State University in 2005. Writes for American Live Wire, GM Roadster and Northstar Media