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Why Are Latino Children Afraid Of Donald Trump? — ‘The Why’

Welcome to the newest edition of The Why.Why are Latino children afraid of Donald Trump?” Good question. (No room for quips today.)

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So you can figure out how to make a pinata but not how to fill out the immigration papers?/Image: Ink361

Before we begin, did you know that Trump piñatas are selling like hot tamales over the border in Tijuana? It’s unfortunate that those who are the deserved targets of trump’s anger—illegal aliens—probably won’t steal back across the border to Mexico and buy one. But as a survey of border guards could tell you—no one sneaks across from the US to Mexico.

Our guest today Hector Tobar an online contributor to The New York Times claims that “ever since (Trump) began his campaign for the Republican presidential nomination with a screed against (illegal) Mexican immigrants, Donald J. Trump has become a figure of dread and comic-book meanness to the Latino community.”

He explains: “In families like (7 year-old) Hugo’s, Mr. Trump’s campaign speaks to a child’s greatest fear: the possibility that he might be separated from his parents. Hugo was born in the United States, but his mother and father came here (illegally) from Mexico 10 years ago.”

Hugo’s father admits to telling his son a lie. He confessed to Tobar: “We tell him we don’t have the same papers he does.” (In truth, you don’t have any papers because you are illegal aliens.)

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Don’t fear Trump. ninos. Fear the trouble your illegal alien parents could get into if you attract toomuch attention to you and your family./Image: ComingOffFaith

Hugo’s anonymous father added: “We have to explain that there are people like Donald Trump . . . who are against it.”  (Yes. Honest citizens think everyone should be treated equally and illegal aliens should not be given any special favors . . . unless they’re willing to vote Democrat.)

9-year-old, Alexandra Rubalcava, told Tobar that she thinks Trump “wants to kick out the Mexican people from America and just leave the American people. She thinks that “we should all be treated the right way.”

While Alexandra must’ve learned that American citizen all the same in the eyes of the law, her illegal alien parents must have hidden the fact that she is only a citizen because her illegal alien parents snuck across the border before her mom popped her out. She must not have been told that her parents who are hypocritically telling her to do the right thing are to this day still criminals.

Fear not, Alexandra.  Life is not fair and in America criminals sometimes go unpunished.  The elected leaders of this country may continue to claim it’s too difficult and expensive to actually do the right thing and enforce the law.

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Don’t fear Trump. ninos. Fear the trouble your illegal alien parents could get into if you attract toomuch attention to you and your family./Image: Breitbart

Even if your relatives are illegal aliens, you were born here. You still have all the rights and privileges—even more so actually—than the children of legal citizens.

Perhaps once you take advantage of all the opportunities—free education, health benefits, college tuition discounts—you’ll learn the truth.  Maybe you’ll be able to forgive Trump for the remarks he made under pressure.  After all, how terrible could mere words be when compared to the hypocrisy and criminal acts of your own parents?

In truth, rather than fear Trump, you should fear how your own actions–applying for the tuition discounts or talking sh*t at protests–could draw unwanted attention to the lawbreakers at home.  You won’t be anchor babies forever, niños, and all good things must come to an end.

Why are Latino children afraid of Donald Trump? Now you know.

You ask the questions.  We provide the answers.

American Live Wire . . . Listen and be heard.

 

About Will Phoenix

W. Scott Phoenix, B.A., B.S. was born in Hawaii, raised in Pennsylvania and resides in California. He has been a published writer since 1978. His work has appeared (under various names) in numerous places in print and online including Examiner.com. He is a single parent of three children and has also worked as an actor, singer and teacher. He has been employed by such publications as the Daily Collegian and the Los Angeles Times.